CURSO WORDPRESS

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CURSO WORDPRESS - Cursos sobre WordPress

WordPress 3.7 Beta 2

WordPress 3.7 Beta 2 is now available for download and testing. This is software still in development, so we don’t recommend that you run it on a production site.

This has been a quiet beta period. We’re hoping to get some more testers for automatic background updates, which will occur for security and minor releases (like updating from 3.7 to 3.7.1). It’s really easy to test this, as Beta 2 will update* each day to the latest development version and then email you the results. If something goes wrong, you can report it — it’s that simple. To get the beta, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the beta here (zip). Check out Dashboard → Updates to see if your install is eligible for background updates. WordPress won’t update if, for example, you’re using version control like SVN or Git.

For more of what’s new in version 3.7, check out the Beta 1 blog post. In Beta 2, we further increased the stability of background updates and also added about 50 bug fixes, including a fix for Internet Explorer 11 in the visual editor.

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. Or, if you’re comfortable writing a bug report, file one on the WordPress Trac. There, you can also find a list of known bugs and everything we’ve fixed.

Happy testing!

Beta 2 released
Dotting i’s and crossing t’s

Expect RC next

WordPress News

WordPress 3.7 Beta 1

I’m pleased to announce the availability of WordPress 3.7 Beta 1.

For WordPress 3.7 we decided to shorten the development cycle and focus on a few key improvements. We plan to release the final product in October, and then follow it in December with a jam-packed WordPress 3.8 release, which is already in development. Some of the best stuff in WordPress 3.7 is subtle — by design! So let’s walk through what we’d love for you to test, just in time for the weekend.

Automatic, background updates. 3.7 Beta 1 will keep itself updated. That’s right — you’ll be updated each night to the newest development build, and eventually to Beta 2. We’re working to provide as many installs as possible with fast updates to security releases of WordPress — and you can help us test by just installing Beta 1 on your server and seeing how it works!

When you go to Dashboard → Updates, you’ll see a note letting you know whether your install is working for automatic updates. There are a few situations where WordPress can’t reliably and securely update itself. But if it can, you’ll get an email (sent to the ‘Admin Email’ on the General Settings page) after each update letting you know what worked and what didn’t. If it worked, great! If something failed, the email will suggest you make a post in the support forums or create a bug report.

Here are some other things you should test out:

  • If you’re running WordPress in another language, we’ll automatically download any available translations for official WordPress importers and the default themes. (More to come here.)
  • Our password meter got a whole lot better, thanks to Dropbox’s zxcvbn library. Again, subtle but effective. Strong passwords are very important!
  • Search results are now ordered by relevance, rather than just by date. When your keywords match post titles and not just content, they’ll be pushed to the top.
  • Developers should check out the new advanced date queries in WP_Query. (#18694)

This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. I’d suggest setting up a test site just to play with the new version. To test WordPress 3.7, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the beta here (zip).

As always, if you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. Or, if you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on the WordPress Trac. There, you can also find a list of known bugs and everything we’ve fixed so far.

Happy testing!

WordPress three seven
Saves your weary hand a click
Updates while you sleep

WordPress News

WordPress 3.6.1 Maintenance and Security Release

After nearly 7 million downloads of WordPress 3.6, we are pleased to announce the availability of version 3.6.1. This maintenance release fixes 13 bugs in version 3.6, which was a very smooth release.

WordPress 3.6.1 is also a security release for all previous WordPress versions and we strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately. It addresses three issues fixed by the WordPress security team:

  • Block unsafe PHP unserialization that could occur in limited situations and setups, which can lead to remote code execution. Reported by Tom Van Goethem.
  • Prevent a user with an Author role, using a specially crafted request, from being able to create a post “written by” another user. Reported by Anakorn Kyavatanakij.
  • Fix insufficient input validation that could result in redirecting or leading a user to another website. Reported by Dave Cummo, a Northrup Grumman subcontractor for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Additionally, we’ve adjusted security restrictions around file uploads to mitigate the potential for cross-site scripting.

We appreciated responsible disclosure of these issues directly to our security team. For more information on the changes, see the release notes or consult the list of changes.

Download WordPress 3.6.1 or update now from the Dashboard → Updates menu in your site’s admin area.

WordPress News

WordPress 3.6 “Oscar”

The latest and greatest WordPress, version 3.6, is now live to the world and includes a beautiful new blog-centric theme, bullet-proof autosave and post locking, a revamped revision browser, native support for audio and video embeds, and improved integrations with Spotify, Rdio, and SoundCloud. Here’s a video that shows off some of the features using our cast of professional actors:

We’re calling this release “Oscar” in honor of the great jazz pianist Oscar Peterson. Here’s a bit more about some of the new features, which you can also find on the about page in your dashboard after you upgrade.

User Features

  • The new Twenty Thirteen theme inspired by modern art puts focus on your content with a colorful, single-column design made for media-rich blogging.
  • Revamped Revisions save every change and the new interface allows you to scroll easily through changes to see line-by-line who changed what and when.
  • Post Locking and Augmented Autosave will especially be a boon to sites where more than a single author is working on a post. Each author now has their own autosave stream, which stores things locally as well as on the server (so much harder to lose something) and there’s an interface for taking over editing of a post, as demonstrated beautifully by our bearded buddies in the video above.
  • Built-in HTML5 media player for native audio and video embeds with no reliance on external services.
  • The Menu Editor is now much easier to understand and use.

Developer features

  • A new audio/video API gives you access to metadata like ID3 tags.
  • You can now choose HTML5 markup for things like comment and search forms, and comment lists.
  • Better filters for how revisions work, so you can store a different amount of history for different post types.
  • Tons more listed on the Codex, and of course you can always browse the over 700 closed tickets.

The Band

This release was led by Mark Jaquith and Aaron Campbell, and included contributions from the following fine folks. Pull up some Oscar Peterson on your music service of choice, or vinyl if you have it, and check out some of their profiles:

Aaron Brazell, Aaron D. Campbell, Aaron Holbrook, Aaron Jorbin, Adam Harley, adamsilverstein, AK Ted, Alex Concha, Alex King, Alex Mills (Viper007Bond), Amaury Balmer, Amy Hendrix (sabreuse), Anatol Broder, Andrew Nacin, Andrew Ozz, Andrew Ryno, Andy Skelton, Antonio, apimlott, awellis13, Barry, Beau Lebens, BelloSwan, bilalcoder, Billy (bananastalktome), bobbingwide, Bob Gregor, bradparbs, Brady Vercher, Brandon Kraft, Brian Layman, Brian Zeligson, Bryan Petty, Callum Macdonald, Carl Danley, Caspie, Charleston Software Associates, cheeserolls, Chip Bennett, Chris Olbekson, Christopher Cochran, Christopher Finke, Chris Wallace, Cor van Noorloos, crazycoders, Daniel Bachhuber, Daniel Dvorkin (MZAWeb), Daniel Jalkut (Red Sweater), daniloercoli, Danny de Haan, Dave Ross, David Favor, David Trower, David Williamson, Dion Hulse, dllh, Dominik Schilling (ocean90), dovyp, Drew Jaynes (DrewAPicture), dvarga, Edward Caissie, elfin, Empireoflight, Eric Andrew Lewis, Erick Hitter, Eric Mann, Evan Solomon, faishal, feedmeastraycat, Frank Klein, Franz Josef Kaiser, FStop, Gabriel Koen, Gary Cao, Gary Jones, gcorne, GeertDD, Gennady Kovshenin, George Stephanis, gish, Gregory Karpinsky, hakre, hbanken, hebbet, Helen Hou-Sandi, helgatheviking, hirozed, hurtige, hypertextranch, Ian Dunn, Ipstenu (Mika Epstein), jakub, James Michael DuPont, jbutkus, Jeremy Felt, Jerry Bates (JerrySarcastic), Jesper Johansen (Jayjdk), Joe Hoyle, Joen Asmussen, Joey Kudish, John Blackbourn (johnbillion), John James Jacoby, Jonas Bolinder (jond3r), Jonathan Desrosiers, Jon Bishop, Jon Cave, Jose Castaneda, Joseph Scott, Josh Visick, jrbeilke, jrf, Justin de Vesine, Justin Sainton, kadamwhite, Kailey (trepmal), karmatosed, Kelly Dwan, keoshi, Konstantin Kovshenin, Konstantin Obenland, ktdreyer, Kurt Payne, kwight, Lance Willett, Lee Willis (leewillis77), lessbloat, Mantas Malcius, Maor Chasen, Marcel Brinkkemper, MarcusPope, Mark-k, Mark Jaquith, Mark McWilliams, Marko Heijnen, Matt Banks, Matthew Boynes, MatthewRuddy, Matt Wiebe, Max Cutler, Mel Choyce, mgibbs189, Michael, Michael Adams (mdawaffe), Michael Beckwith, Michael Fields, Mike Hansen, Mike Schroder, Milan Dinic, mitcho (Michael Yoshitaka Erlewine), Mohammad Jangda, najamelan, Naoko Takano, Nashwan Doaqan, Niall Kennedy, Nick Daugherty, Nick Halsey, ninnypants, norcross, ParadisePorridge, Paul, Paul Clark, pavelevap, Pete Mall, Peter Westwood, Phill Brown, Pippin Williamson, Pollett, Prasath Nadarajah, programmin, rachelbaker, Rami Yushuvaev, redpixelstudios, reidburke, retlehs, Reuben Gunday, rlerdorf, Rodrigo Primo, roulandf, rovo89, Ryan Duff, Ryan Hellyer, Ryan McCue, Safirul Alredha, sara cannon, scholesmafia, Scott Kingsley Clark, Scott Reilly, Scott Taylor, scribu, Seisuke Kuraishi (tenpura), Sergej, Sergey Biryukov, Simon Hampel, Simon Wheatley, Siobhan, sirzooro, slene, solarissmoke, SriniG, Stephen Harris, storkontheroof, Sunny Ratilal, sweetie089, Tar, Taylor Lovett, Thomas van der Beek, Tim Carr, tjsingleton, TobiasBg, toscho, Tracy Rotton, TravisHoffman, uuf6429, Vitor Carvalho, wojtek, wpewill, WraithKenny, wycks, Xavier Borderie, Yoav Farhi, Zachary Brown, Zack Tollman, zekeweeks, ziegenberg, and viniciusmassuchetto.

Time to upgrade!

WordPress News

WordPress 3.6 Release Candidate 2

The second release candidate for WordPress 3.6 is now available for download and testing.

We’re down to only a few remaining issues, and the final release should be available in a matter of days. In RC2, we’ve tightened up some aspects of revisions, autosave, and the media player, and fixed some bugs that were spotted in RC1. Please test this release candidate as much as you can, so we can deliver a smooth final release!

Think you’ve found a bug? Please post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums.

Developers, please continue to test your plugins and themes, so that if there is a compatibility issue, we can figure it out before the final release. You can find our list of known issues here.

To test WordPress 3.6, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the release candidate here (zip).

Revisions so smooth
We autosave your changes
Data loss begone!

WordPress News

Annual WordPress Survey & WCSF

It’s time for our third annual user and developer survey! If you’re a WordPress user, developer, or business, we want your feedback. Just like previous years, we’ll share the data at the upcoming WordCamp San Francisco (WCSF). Results will also be sent to each survey respondent.

It only takes a few minutes to fill out the survey, which will provide an overview of how people use WordPress.

If you missed past State of the Word keynotes, be sure to check out them out for survey results from 2011 and 2012.

Speaking of WCSF, if you didn’t get a ticket or are too far away to attend, you can still get a ticket for the live stream! Watch the live video stream from the comfort of your home on July 26 and 27; WCSF t-shirt, or any shirt, optional.

I hope to see you there.

WordPress News

WordPress 3.6 Release Candidate

The first release candidate for WordPress 3.6 is now available.

We hope to ship WordPress 3.6 in a couple weeks. But to do that, we really need your help! If you haven’t tested 3.6 yet, there’s no time like the present. (But please: not on a live production site, unless you’re feeling especially adventurous.)

Think you’ve found a bug? Please post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. If any known issues come up, you’ll be able to find them here. Developers, please test your plugins and themes, so that if there is a compatibility issue, we can sort it out before the final release.

To test WordPress 3.6, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the release candidate here (zip).

As you may have heard, we backed the Post Format UI feature out of the release. On the other hand, our slick new revisions browser had some extra time to develop. You should see it with 200+ revisions loaded — scrubbing back and forth at lightning speed is a thing of beauty.

Delayed, but still loved
The release will be out soon
Test it, por favor

WordPress News

WordPress 3.5.1 Maintenance and Security Release

WordPress 3.5.1 is now available. Version 3.5.1 is the first maintenance release of 3.5, fixing 37 bugs. It is also a security release for all previous WordPress versions. For a full list of changes, consult the list of tickets and the changelog, which include:

  • Editor: Prevent certain HTML elements from being unexpectedly removed or modified in rare cases.
  • Media: Fix a collection of minor workflow and compatibility issues in the new media manager.
  • Networks: Suggest proper rewrite rules when creating a new network.
  • Prevent scheduled posts from being stripped of certain HTML, such as video embeds, when they are published.
  • Work around some misconfigurations that may have caused some JavaScript in the WordPress admin area to fail.
  • Suppress some warnings that could occur when a plugin misused the database or user APIs.

Additionally, a bug affecting Windows servers running IIS can prevent updating from 3.5 to 3.5.1. If you receive the error “Destination directory for file streaming does not exist or is not writable,” you will need to follow the steps outlined on the Codex.

WordPress 3.5.1 also addresses the following security issues:

  • A server-side request forgery vulnerability and remote port scanning using pingbacks. This vulnerability, which could potentially be used to expose information and compromise a site, affects all previous WordPress versions. This was fixed by the WordPress security team. We’d like to thank security researchers Gennady Kovshenin and Ryan Dewhurst for reviewing our work.
  • Two instances of cross-site scripting via shortcodes and post content. These issues were discovered by Jon Cave of the WordPress security team.
  • A cross-site scripting vulnerability in the external library Plupload. Thanks to the Moxiecode team for working with us on this, and for releasing Plupload 1.5.5 to address this issue.

Download 3.5.1 or visit Dashboard → Updates in your site admin to update now.

WordPress News

WordPress 3.6 Beta 1

WordPress 3.6 Beta 1 is now available!

This is software still in development and we really don’t recommend that you run it on a production site — set up a test site just to play with the new version. To test WordPress 3.6, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the beta here (zip).

We’ve been working for nearly three months and have completed all the features that are slated for this release. This is a bit of a change from the betas of previous release cycles. I felt very strongly that we shouldn’t release a beta if we were still working on completing the main features. This beta is actually a beta, not an alpha that we’re calling a beta. If you are a WordPress plugin or theme developer, or a WordPress hosting provider, you should absolutely start testing your code against this new version now. More bugs will be fixed, and some of the features will get polished, but we’re not going to shove in some big new feature. We’re ready for you to test it, so jump in there! The more you test the beta, the more stable our release candidates and our final release will be.

As always, if you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. Or, if you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on the WordPress Trac. There, you can also find a list of known bugs and everything we’ve fixed so far.

Here’s what’s new in 3.6:

  • Post Formats:  Post Formats now have their own UI, and theme authors have access to templating functions to access the structured data.
  • Twenty Thirteen: We’re shipping this year’s default theme in our first release of the year. Twenty Thirteen is an opinionated, color-rich, blog-centric theme that makes full use of the new Post Formats support.
  • Audio/Video: You can embed audio and video files into your posts without relying on a plugin or a third party media hosting service.
  • Autosave:  Posts are now autosaved locally. If your browser crashes, your computer dies, or the server goes offline as you’re saving, you won’t lose the your post.
  • Post Locking:  See when someone is currently editing a post, and kick them out of it if they fall asleep at the keyboard.
  • Nav Menus:  Nav menus have been simplified with an accordion-based UI, and a separate tab for bulk-assigning menus to locations.
  • Revisions: The all-new revisions UI features avatars, a slider that “scrubs” through history, and two-slider range comparisons.

Developers:  You make WordPress awesome(er). One of the things we strive to do with every release is be compatible with existing plugins and themes. But we need your help. Please test your plugins and themes against 3.6. If something isn’t quite right, please let us know. (Chances are, it wasn’t intentional.) If you’re a forward-thinking theme developer, you should be looking at implementing the new Post Format support in some of your themes (look to Twenty Thirteen for inspiration).

We’re looking forward to your feedback. If you break it (i.e. find a bug), please report it, and if you’re a developer, try to help us fix it. We’ve already had more than 150 contributors to version 3.6 — it’s not too late to join the party!

WordPress News

Save the Date: May 27

What’s on May 27, you ask?

May 27, 2013 is the 10th anniversary of the first WordPress release!

We think this is worth celebrating, and we want WordPress fans all over the world to celebrate with us by throwing their own parties. We’re using Meetup Everywhere to coordinate, and will be putting up a website just for the 10th Anniversary so that we can collect photos, videos, tweets, and posts from all the parties.

The rules are very simple:

  1. Pick a place to go where a bunch of people can be merry — a park, a bar, a backyard, whatever
  2. Spread the word to local meetups, tech groups, press, etc and get people to say they’ll come to your party
  3. If 50 or more people RSVP to your party, we’ll try to send you some WordPress stickers and buttons
  4. Have party attendees post photos, videos, and the like with the #wp10 hashtag

We’ll be using Meetup Everywhere to coordinate parties all over the world, so get your city on the map and register your party now !

We’ll follow up with registered organizers  over the next few weeks with some tips for how to publicize your party and to get addresses for swag packages. To that end, make sure you check the option that lets WordPress 10th Anniversary know your email, or we won’t be able to get in touch with you for these things or to give you access to the WP10 blog.

Whose party will be the biggest? The most fun? The most inventive? Will it be yours?

Note: If you already run a group on meetup.com, making your party an event in your group is great, but you still need to post it and have people RSVP at the special party page, because regular groups and Meetup Everywhere groups aren’t connected yet. 

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